“Monastery Cuisine”, eg KTO: from one office to another

KTO AND YOUTUBE – ON REQUEST – BROADCAST

“When I start to have a drink in my nose, when I’ve squeezed it well, I like, just before eating to whet my appetite, to mate an episode of” Monastery Cuisine “on @KTOTV. The sisters peel things up, tell their life stories. Big trip. » As you can see, in this tweet posted in 2020 by a certain @tronchedecakethis show of the catholic channel KTO, founded in 1999, has not only children of choir between its aficionados.

Moreover, “La Cuisine des monastères”, which could be imagined as gastronomically contrite, is in fact exciting in various ways. First, for believers — of whom we are not — it is an immersion in the daily spiritual and domestic life of congregations of various orders and obediences.

Some of these congregations operate in an almost closed circuit, picking from the vegetable garden and orchard what will be prepared.

Baie cu baie, because there is a tempting cuisine. So much so that one would gladly slip into one of the dining room tables where, decidedly, what is proposed is closer to a generous and rich bistro cuisine – except in the liturgical moments that outlaw it – than of the food served to so many communities.

Some of these congregations operate in an almost closed circuit, picking from the vegetable garden and orchard (the apple is often featured) which will be prepared, picking eggs or picking milk when a poultry or dairy farm is associated with it. Otherwise, the kitchens are busy with local vendors or receive in-kind donations.

Pain soup

In any case, we do what we have and never waste. The recipes are culturally diverse – foreign nuns are sometimes in the stove – or have been developed and noted by alumni. From the potato stuffed with cheese, nuts, egg and cream, by Brother Hervé-Marie, to kig ha farz, the Finistère pot-au-feu, by Brother François-Xavier, the kitchen does not give slimming Michel Guérard.

But as is often reminded, members of the congregation work hard, and often in the open air: they must be rebuffed, even if some women and men, older and less active, benefit from ad hoc menus. And why not eat lean but consistent, thanks, for example, to the “fish of a thousand colors” of Sister Pascale-François, of African origin?

The title is obviously a nod to the legendary “Cuisine des mousquetaires”, by Maïté and Micheline Banzet, on France 3

When Brother Laurent proposes a rather dietary cold zucchini soup, the monk with generous shapes can’t help but accompany it with Camembert treats and a breaded Camembert. Another delight, one “Recipe that lasts in monasteries”, but “For Lent”says the very friendly sister Marie-France: the panade, a bread soup for the winter – which is still crème brûlée after you have cured the bread stale in the water.

Sister Marie-France inadvertently became one of the stars of the series, imagined by François Lespés, whose title is obviously a nod to the legendary “Cuisine des mousquetaires”, by Maïté and Micheline Banzet, on France 3, from 1991 to 1997. She is not the only one to attract the most sincere sympathy, but nothing is worth her almost naughty eye and her rosy face of delicacy when she says of her panade: “Warm up, it’s even better!” »

“La Cuisine des monastères”, François Lespés’ show, is broadcast one Friday a month at 5 pm. Available in replay on the KTO website and on YouTube.

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